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The (Dual) Citizenship Dilemma

October 24, 2011

About three weeks ago, I nervously sent out my application for American citizenship. Yes, I finally took the next step. I have lived in the US for the same amount of time as I did growing up in Germany and the decision to become a citizen has been an easy one for me. I love living in this country and feel more American than German in some ways. How do they say–I’ve become Americanized!!!

Today, I received my “receipt” and now the application is being processed. If everything checks out, the next step will be fingerprinting. Again!!! ( I’ve had to do that so many times already since receiving and renewing my green card! ) After the fingerprinting and background checks are completed it will be time for the interview. I’m not too worried about it because I’ve “studied” the information for the test for years. The only thing getting in my way will be my nerves — I always get sooooo nervous – sweaty hands and all. Ugh!!!

One decision, however, I had to think about a little–do I keep my German citizenship and become a dual-citizen or go all the way…and become an American citizen. I choose not to keep my German citizenship! That doesn’t mean I’m going to march to the German Consulate and renounce it. It just means I’m not taking the extra steps to make sure I can keep it. ( I would have to pay the German government fees, as well as, fill out mounts of paperwork and show that I have ties and family in Germany. Many people might not understand and get offended by that choice, but it is my choice.

Both my husband and children are American citizen – by birth. I’ve put down firm roots here and have no desire to leave this country. In some ways, I’m idealistic by wanting to be a citizen…I want to pledge my allegiance to the flag, and be able to vote and proudly say ” I am an American!” And isn’t that what it’s all about? The American dream? That’s just me. People choose to become citizens for many reason and that’s their right.

Also, in a way I feel being a German citizen is my birthright and I shouldn’t have to pay and do mounts of paperwork to keep that. I was born in  Germany and raised there–I’ve always been proud to say that and I will always have that in my heart.(Part of my heart will always bleed black, red and gold!) It won’t simply go away when the time comes for me to take my oath of allegiance.

So, now the nail-biting and waiting begin.

Let me know what you think? Is it the right choice?

 

 

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